Hacks for Crafting a Killer Webinar Presentation – Part 2: Webinar PowerPoint Design

This blog is “part two” of a two-part series that details steps to take to develop a killer webinar presentation. Part one covered best practices for developing the content for your presentation, and this blog will include hacks for designing the webinar PowerPoint presentation, best practices for placing your content on slides and then tips for adding images.

If you haven’t read part one yet, check it out here. I will be referring to it often.

 

Designing your webinar PowerPoint Presentation

PowerPoint is a powerful tool and has more features that you probably ever considered.

You don’t need to be a designer to build a professional, sleek webinar PowerPoint presentation. You just need to have a little bit of creativity and patience. If your company doesn’t have a corporate PowerPoint template that you must use for your webinars, you are lucky enough to have the chance to develop a presentation that mirrors the tone of your webinar.

Before you start designing your webinar PowerPoint, decide what that tone is. Is this a serious webinar? Or maybe it can be a little playful, or have a modern take to it. Think of who your ideal audience is that you will try and get to register, that will be your first clue for selecting the design of the webinar PowerPoint.

 

Steps for Designing a Webinar PowerPoint

  1. Open your PowerPoint program; you should see a list of ready-made templates you can use. Such as below. Select the template that best fits the look you are going for. Note – we will review below how to change the colors of the template, only pick a template based on the design for this step.
webinar-presentation-1
Pick a webinar PowerPoint template
  1. Once you select your template, you can choose your colors. There are a few options to do this:
  • Under the Design tab, you can immediately choose different colors for your template, like the blue, brown or green. Look at the screenshot below for example.
webinar-presentation-2
Choose your color palate

 

  • OR if you have corporate brand standards, you can customize the background color and font size to your company’s colors. To customize the background, in the Design tab you will select the ‘Format Background’ button, make sure ‘Solid Fill’ is selected, click the color bucket to the right of ‘Color.’ A pop-up will open, and you can then input your corporate colors using the RGB sliders or Hex#. Notice the screenshot below. The slide is now gray!

 

webinar-presentation-3

 

  1. The next step is updating your font colors. You can, of course, select from any of the available colors, but if you’d like to use corporate colors or custom colors, go back to the Home Tab, select some text on a slide and then select the Font Color button – click on ‘More colors.’ Again, a pop-up will open, and you can use the RGB sliders or Hex# to find your colors. These colors will be saved in PowerPoint in the colors section under ‘Recent colors’ to select from again as you build your webinar PowerPoint.

webinar-presentation 4

  1. Logo – if you want to promote your company via your webinar PowerPoint, there are two easy hacks to get your logo on each slide.
    1. Add the Logo on the Slide Master – detailed instructions here.
    2. Or you can add your logo on the first slide of your webinar PowerPoint, typically your Title Slide. Once you place the logo in the spot you prefer, right-click on the logo and select copy. Go to each of your slides in your deck and press Paste. This will place the logo in the same spot for each of your slides.

That’s it! Now you have your PowerPoint design and colors set.

 

Placing Content in the Webinar PowerPoint

Some may not realize this, but you can find multiple slide layouts for PowerPoint templates. You can find these by being in the Home tab – click on the ‘layout’ button. As you can see in the below screenshot, there are a variety of designs to choose from to get your message across. Whether it’s a section slide, a two image slide design, captions, or even a vertical layout.

webinar-presentation-5
Pick your slide layout

In the part one blog, I had you highlight the most important elements of your webinar script. This highlighted content is to be the foundation of the content you place in your webinar PowerPoint slides.

Please do not copy and paste your script content directly onto your PowerPoint slides. There will be too much text, and then what is the point in you even talking if they can just read your entire presentation on your webinar PowerPoint?

You will want to break-up the content from your webinar script in short, digestible bites – this will allow your webinar attendees to listen to what you are saying rather than reading a story from your PowerPoint slides. Let’s break up the parts of a webinar PowerPoint piece by piece.

 

What content to place on the first 4 slides:

Title Slide: Put the title of the webinar, speaker(s) name, date, company logo.

Bio Slide: Picture of webinar speaker(s) and short bullets on who they are.

Agenda Slide: A Short-bulleted list of what will be discussed. (I used the agenda example from part-one of the blog series!)

Objectives Slide: Another short-bulleted list of what webinar attendees will take away from attending this webinar (example: 5 Hacks for Crafting a Killer Webinar Presentation)

 

These first 4 slides are the easiest to build, and should be the shortest. Don’t overthink these slides. They should be simple to follow and let your attendees know their purpose for being there the next 45 minutes to an hour. Check out the below 4 screenshots for examples of these slides.

 

Sample Intro Slides 

webinar-presentation-6

webinar-presentation-8

webinar-presentation-9

Typically, each webinar has a few main points to make or a couple of different sections. Please refer to the part-one blog for more information on writing these different sections. For this blog, I am going to again assume you have 4 sections of content called the what, why, how, and when.  We will call this part of the webinar PowerPoint the “body” – think of when you were school and the elements of an essay, this is the meat of your webinar, and you’ll have most of your slides in these sections.

For each of your 4 sections, you should have already highlighted the most important parts. You likely highlighted whole sentences. You will want to turn those sentences into short, digestible, easy to read bullets to illustrate your point or argument.

Once you have gathered the summarized text for each of your sections, I recommend you write a very short intro for each of your sections, and then 3-5 highlight bullets for what will be covered in this section. Almost like your agenda. You don’t need only to list what will be covered. You could instead name 3 important stats, a quote from an expert, or list of qualifications.

For each of your bullets, you can create a separate slide for each that dives deeper into the content. The below (some are silly!) screenshots will make this clearer. Start each section with its own sub-title slide to introduce each section. This will help let your attendees know that a new section of the webinar PowerPoint is starting as well.

webinar-presentation-10

webinar-presentation-11

webinar-presentation-12

 

The last slide (above) is a great example of a time to put in either a relevant image, call-out a quick stat, quote or comment. You could still list few short bullets on this slide to further illustrate your point too. The goal is not to overwhelm any of your slides, but to break up the content from your script. In these slides, you can also highlight a short snippet of the stories or examples you share from your webinar script.

Each slide should only be filled with 30-50% of text. If you’re covering a complex topic, think of a way to break it down without having to type it all out. A webinar PowerPoint should be a reference tool, not a script or a book. That is where your webinar script comes in handy, you’ll have all the points handy that you want to make, without having to remember it by just looking at a slide.

Now that the “meatiest” part of the webinar PowerPoint content is complete, you will create a ReCap or Takeaway slide. On this slide, you will pull out a few main bullets that you’ll want your webinar attendees to remember if nothing else. After this, you should proceed to your Q&A session (if this is part of your agenda).

Never leave your webinar attendees hanging, provide them information on a slide with the next steps you detailed in your webinar script. By sharing the information, it will give them time to screenshot the slide or write it down.

Finally, place your contact information on the last slide so that your webinar attendees can reach you, and you’re done with the content piece.

webinar-presentation-13

webinar-presentation-14

webinar-presentation-15

webinar-presentation-16

 

Using Images on your PowerPoint Slides

Slides looking a little bare? Jazz them up a bit with some images! Use images to illustrate each of your sections for your webinar PowerPoint. Ensure that your chosen images are relevant and drive home the point you are trying to make. Or add a little humor, it will keep everyone awake during the presentation.

There are a couple of free image websites I love to use. Check out the full list here. I recommend starting here to find images to ensure you are not infringing on any copyrights. Check out this blog for more information on copyright infringement.

My last tip for images is to use the ‘Design Ideas’ function in PowerPoint. It will offer a variety of ways to design your slide based on the image you drop in the webinar PowerPoint slide.  Check out the below screenshot for examples. It’s a quick, sure way to make your webinar PowerPoint look better in no time. You can find the ‘Design Ideas’ by selecting the Design tab at the top and then click on the ‘Design Ideas’ button. Note, this feature will usually only work if you have an image already on the slide. Or this feature will sometimes automatically pop-up when you drag an image to a slide from your desktop.

 

webinar-presentation-16

 

 

With this blog series, you have a variety of tips and tricks at your fingertips to develop a professional, branded and fun webinar PowerPoint. Give these tips a go, and have fun. Use this template as your foundation to begin building your own webinar PowerPoint presentation.

 

Get started!

To host amazing webinar PowerPoint presentations, you’ll need premium webinar software.

Start your free trial of BigMarker today or send us a message to get in touch!

 

Hacks for Crafting a Killer Webinar Presentation – Part 1: The Webinar Content

Crafting a killer webinar presentation is not simple, but with this two-part blog series, you will have the perfect tutorial at your fingertips to learn how to craft your very own killer webinar presentation that delivers results.

This blog series is ideal for those who want to host webinars, but don’t have the budget for an in-house content writer or graphic designer to help pull together killer webinar presentations. The good news is, you don’t need that in-house expertise! As long as you or someone internally is an expert on the content topic you wish to speak about, you can still pull off a professional webinar presentation that will be sure to impress.

A webinar presentation utilizes a PowerPoint 99.9% of the time unless you are hosting a webinar demo of a software platform. This PowerPoint presentation is the focus of the webinar and what your webinar attendees will be looking at throughout the length of the entire presentation. Since it is the star, it is important to build your webinar presentation with a solid foundation. That solid foundation is your content. The content is your webinar script.

It is not ideal to start building your webinar presentation before your script. I’ve met way too many webinar speakers that prefer to just “wing it” when it comes to what they will be saying during the live webinar. If you’re a charismatic speaker and know your content inside and out, the webinar might still go well, but you will be doing your webinar audience a disservice.

 

Here is why winging it is never a good idea:

  1. You’re able to easily get off track as you didn’t properly plan on how to deliver the content
  2. You might share information that confuses attendees or not share enough information
  3. If you’re stressed out before the webinar, sick, or having a bad day – you might lose focus and forget key points or stories that would enhance the content of webinar
  4. You’re more likely to be nervous, as each slide you look at you will have to think of what to say, vs. already knowing what to say

 

These are just a few reasons, but there are so many more! A webinar presentation script is your life boat. It helps you to be confident in what you’re saying and knowing you are delivering the very best content to your audience, at the right time in the live webinar presentation.

Considering the webinar script is the foundation of your webinar presentation we are going to review in-depth how to prepare your script and then how to use that script to select the content for your webinar presentation.

First start you will start with a Word document to note all your ideas, points you want to make and the flow of the webinar presentation you are aiming for. It is much easier to start from one continuous document, than going directly to PowerPoint and figuring it out from there.

Once you have down the direction you want, it’s time to start building your script on that same Word document, from start to finish.

When I say script, I mean you really want to write down each word you plan on speaking during the live webinar. Of course, you can’t script the Q&A section, or what you might say based on your audience’s poll answers or chat comments (and you most definitely need to comment or relate to those answers!), but that will be the only time you need to think of what to say – the rest of your webinar presentation track will be a well-oiled machine. That way if a webinar attendee asks a question that you know you will be covering later in the webinar, you can tell them to stay tuned, vs. side-tracking the whole webinar  presentation to answer that question and potentially confuse other attendees who don’t understand the concept yet.

As you build your script, include the following 9 parts. Through writing down content for all 9 parts, you will then have your entire talk track ready for the day of the webinar and ensure it aligns with your webinar presentation PowerPoint content and what main points you want your webinar attendees to takeaway.

Additionally, during your dry-runs, as you read out loud your webinar presentation script to your team, as a group you can collaborate on gaps in content or chunky transitions. With this feedback, you can quickly update your script so that the live webinar is seamless and you can ensure you are hitting on all the reasons your webinar attendees signed up to attend in the first place.

 

The 9 Parts of a Webinar Presentation Script

 

  1. Greeting

During this greeting portion, you will welcome your webinar attendees, thank them for joining, perhaps note a few housekeeping items. You will then introduce yourself and your company, what you do and why you are relevant to speak on this topic. If you have co-webinar speakers, have them introduce themselves as well.

It would be a good idea to run through a very quick tutorial for using the webinar platform from an attendee perspective if you plan to have participants interact with the webinar platform to chat or fill out a poll, for example. Basically, whatever information that is important for you to share to ensure a successful webinar should be stated here before getting started.

Tip: If you do plan on interacting with your webinar attendees through poll, chat or other webinar engagement features like social sharing or white-boarding, you should decide at what times you would like this interaction to happen and place it in your script accordingly so that you do not forget to invite them to write an answer in the chat or fill out the poll at the times it makes sense during the content delivery.

 

Beginning your webinar presentation

 

  1. Agenda

Run through the agenda of the webinar presentation. Your agenda should have 3-5 bullets on what you plan on covering, each bullet should be for a different section of the webinar, and you’ll want to say how long each section should take to review and how long you intend for Q&A at the end of the webinar to answer questions.

To create a “section” you will want to break up the content you intend for them to learn in different chunks as to create the different elements of the webinar. Through doing this, it will make the delivery of content easy to understand in sizable chunks.

As an example of different sections, your first bullet on your agenda could be “The What”, second bullet can be “The Why”, third can be “The How” fourth bullet could be “The When”.

 

  1. Objectives

Write out the objectives of attending this webinar. You could talk about what your attendees will get out of being there, possible next steps after the webinar, or what webinar attendees will now be able to do because of participating in your webinar.

 

  1. Separate Sections for Each Agenda Item

This will be the bulk of your script as you are writing out the content for the entire reason people are attending your webinar in this part. This content is founded on your agenda and objectives of the webinar presentation.

Based on the sections you selected in your agenda and using the example in #2 (the what, why, how, when sections), you will write out all the content you want to say that explains each section individually. You will start with section 1 and write down everything you plan on saying to explain this section, and then move on to section 2, and so on. It is important for clarity that you don’t jump around the different sections during your script, as you might confuse your attendees. Of course, the content should build on each other – stay away from language like, “we will discuss this in section 4” if you are still in section 1.

 

  1. Stories and examples

Your script might include stories and examples alongside the main content for each of your sections.

These are great to include to further explain your point or concept. Another place to include these is after you have reviewed all the sections on your agenda, and then you share stories or examples to reinforce the content in a different way after your audience has had time to process the primary content.

Regardless of how you do it, ensure you have enough relatable stories or examples to include in the content. Stories help your audience understand complex ideas and for them to imagine taking the content and implementing it into their world.

 

Use stories in the content of your webinar presentation

 

  1. Recap / Takeaways

Once you’ve completed section #5 and #6, you will recap what you have shared today, why you have shared it and the top 3-5 things you hope your audience takes away and remembers post-webinar.

During this part would be a good time to encourage your audience to fill out a poll on the favorite thing they heard today, or start the Q&A portion.

 

  1. Next Steps for Attendees

When hosting a webinar, there is usually a next step or action you’d like your webinar audience to take. Perhaps that could be registering for another webinar, downloading an eBook, signing up for a one-on-one demo or encouraging them to buy your product. Whatever it is, give them all the information needed to make that next step. You don’t even want to assume they know what the next step is, or how to complete that step.

  1. Contact information

Share all the ways to get ahold of you, the webinar speaker, or the company you are speaking on behalf of. Include emails, phone numbers, websites and social sites.

 

  1. Closing Comments

Thank them for attending and if there is anything left unsaid, now is the time to say it or continue to reinforce the next action you’d like them to take and how it would benefit them.

As you write your script, take special care to write it out in a conversational tone as you would speak. Write out whole sentences, not fragments – that way if you get nervous or tripped up, you know exactly where to pick back up. And most importantly – practice, practice, practice your script until you can read it as though you are not actually reading from a script. Additionally, time yourself reading your script out loud to ensure you’ve written enough content to last the entire webinar presentation, or see if you need to cut content, as it could be too long.

Once your webinar script is complete and you feel comfortable delivering it as is, even without the aid of a PowerPoint, you can start building the webinar presentation PowerPoint!

You will use this final script to pull from for the content you place on your webinar PowerPoint slides. Take your script and using the highlight feature in Word, highlight the most important elements from each of the above 9 webinar script parts. The idea is to transition these parts to your PowerPoint slides. Building your webinar presentation PowerPoint will be quick and easy following this method.

Note, you will not actually copy and paste your highlighted content directly onto your slides. Instead, you will want to shorten your talk track into short, digestible snippets or “call-outs” to place on your slides.

 

Part 2 Teaser

In Part 2 of this blog series, I will share a sample PowerPoint template which includes what slides to include in your webinar presentation based on the 9 parts of the webinar script. Additionally, each slide in the template will have examples of the type of content to put on these slides. So don’t start building your webinar PowerPoint yet.

In Part 2 we will first review how to design and build your webinar presentation PowerPoint, then how to place your content on this final PowerPoint design and finally tips for adding images to enhance the final look of the PowerPoint.

Check out Part 2 Here

 

Get started!

To host an amazing webinar presentation, you’ll need premium webinar software.

Start your free trial of BigMarker today or send us a message to get in touch!

How to Deliver Effective Marketing Presentations During a Webinar

Effective marketing presentations are the backbone of most companies’ sales force, especially in the B2B world. Organizations rely on these presentations to get their markets excited about the services and/or products they have to offer.

Nowadays, many of these marketing presentations are given over webinars. While these can prove to be very effective mediums, you need to make sure you understand what it takes to make the most of them.

In this article, we’re going to discuss some of the differences between traditional and webinar presentations and also give you lots of tips specific to the latter.

 

Consider the Differences Involved in Hosting a Webinar

When most people are worried about putting together effective marketing presentations, they’re thinking about the kind you do in person.

A webinar is going to be much different. Even if it’s live and you’re allowing people to message in their questions, this is going to be a lot different than an in-person presentation.

Among other things, you won’t get the same kind of feedback you would from an actual audience. Many people simply won’t ask their questions or may save them for later.

If you’ve done presentations in the past, then you may not have too much trouble making this transition. You may simply need to practice as you would when preparing for any other effective marketing presentations, just with someone viewing elsewhere so they can give you feedback.

 

Market Your Webinar to Build Your Audience

Another big difference between traditional marketing presentations and the kind done over webinars has to do with the audience.

Obviously, all effective marketing presentations rely on receptive audiences, but these are much easier to come by with the traditional route.

It involves setting appointments with potential customers – at your venue or theirs – and then putting on the presentation for them. While getting the appointment can sometimes be tricky, once you show up for the presentation, you should most likely have a captive audience.

If you don’t, there are many ways to help rope them in and grab their attention early on before getting to the meat of your presentation.

Unfortunately, this is much harder to do with a webinar.

First of all, you won’t really be setting appointments with people. Instead, you’ll be trying to get them to set the appointment by signing up to attend your webinar.

To do this, you’re going to need to invest in ample marketing. Even once you get someone to sign up, you’ll have to remind them through email to make sure they attend. (Generally, it’s recommended to do this three times, including an email on the day of your presentation.)

Give yourself lots of time for this. Conventional wisdom is that you should spend a month marketing your webinar before you actually go through with it.

 

Make Sure You Focus on Your Audience

All effective marketing presentations are built around the people actually watching them. However, the instinct most people follow is to make it solely about themselves or their product. This is something you must absolutely be sure not to do or your presentation will be lackluster.

People want to hear about themselves. Tuning into your presentation means they’re also interested in your product or service, but keep in mind this is only relative to how it will affect them.

In other words, effective marketing presentations are the ones wherein you’re talking about what your product/service can do for the people on the other side of the screen.

Many successful salespeople understand this as “benefits vs. features.” The latter is what most people talk about. They explain to their audience about all the different bells and whistles their product/service can offer.

While this can work to some degree, it certainly isn’t the hallmark of effective marketing presentations. Instead, you should be explaining the benefits of your product/service. This refers to the effect a certain feature will have on the customer.

For example, if you were selling a new model forklift, you could explain all about its engine, MPG, wheel size, etc. These would be features. On the other hand, you could explain to your audience that this new forklift can do twice as much work as competitor models in half as much time (which is because of the aforementioned features).

Effective marketing presentations focus on the webinar audience

 

Make Sure You Know Your Audience

Along the same lines, be very clear about the types of people you’re going to be speaking to.

This is another example of how effective marketing presentations are different depending on how you’re hosting them. With the traditional version, you generally have a very good idea of whom you’re speaking to because, as we mentioned already, you set up the appointment with them.

When marketing your webinar, you want to do as much as possible to get hyper-specific about the people you’ll be attracting.

That could mean doing different versions of the webinar for different segments of your market. You’d just have to make sure you correctly market these different versions to their appropriate audiences.

If you’re able to understand the type of people on the other side of the screen, you’ll also have a much easier time speaking to their values and focusing on what they want. As we just covered, this will go a long way toward crafting an effective presentation.

Get to the Actual Value Quickly

People who give effective marketing presentations know how to get to the value of their product/service quickly. They understand that their audience will quit paying attention early on if they don’t see a compelling enough reason to keep listening.

There are many ways you can do this, but one of the best is to hit the benefits early. You don’t have to fully explain them right way, just make sure your audience has a reason to pay attention now. They should be interested in finding out more about how it’s possible that your service/product can live up to this promise.

This is even more important to do well when trying to give effective marketing presentations during webinars.

Since your audience isn’t right in front of you, nothing is really keeping them from simply getting up and walking away. They could open up another browser window, jump on their phone or just decide it’s not worth it anymore to listen to your webinar and close out the window altogether.

Just because someone has signed up for your presentation is not a promise they’ll actually attend. And just because they attend is no promise they’re actually going to pay attention or stay.

Don’t take this for granted. Effective marketing presentations work because they get the audience’s attention immediately and keep it.

 

Consider Telling a Story

Another way you can get your audience to sit up and pay attention is with an engaging story.

As humans, we naturally love stories. They can even be quite effective as sales tools.

Just be sure you give people reason to listen. Before beginning the story, give them a hint of what to expect or, once again, make a promise.

“I want to tell you about how I was able to pay off all my debt and become a millionaire in just five years” would be a great way to begin your webinar presentation. It’s certainly a compelling story, but you also told your audience exactly what they have to look forward to by sticking around.

Be careful with stories, though. If your story drags on and on, people may become bored and quit paying attention. Keep the narrative lean and tight.

Also, don’t exaggerate when making your promise. If you get to “The End” and your story was clearly didn’t live up to the hype, why should people keep listening?

Don’t Rely Too Heavily on Your Slides

One reason webinars can make for such effective marketing presentations is because you can use visuals. Slides are often very popular for this. You can display anything from photographs to charts.

However, you need to be careful not to overdo it. Think about how traditional presentations work. They generally involve visuals, too, but the presenter still needs to say plenty.

Visual after visual is going to be boring. This is especially true for graphs and charts where the viewer may have to do a lot of the work to decipher them.

Whenever you use visuals, make sure you add plenty of context through your narrative. This will keep them interesting and ensure your audience pays attention.

 

Make Sure to Include a Call to Action

A call to action (CTA) is how all effective marketing presentations end. That’s because you need to literally tell people what you want them to do next.

This might seem like odd advice. You might think we’re not giving your audience enough credit.

The evidence on this subject is quite clear, though.

When you don’t end with a strong CTA, you risk people simply logging off your webinar page and returning to what they were doing. They may go to your website and look around a bit but not make a purchase like you had hoped.

They might like your webinar but not think to share it because you didn’t bring it up with a CTA.

Again, it might seem odd to get so specific with your audience, especially after you may have spent 30 or more minutes trying to sell them on your product or service. Shouldn’t they know you want them to buy?

Maybe, but why risk it?

Furthermore, you want to make sure they know exactly where to go or click to make sure this happens. Effective marketing presentations that convert don’t leave anything to chance.

 

Record, Edit and Republish It

Now, an advantage you have over “traditional” or in-person marketing presentations is that you can record your webinar and then use it again and again. This is especially good news for people who don’t like getting up in front of people and giving presentations.

To really make the most of these effective marketing presentations, though, you may wish to consider editing them. This could entail anything from sharpening up the audio levels to simply cutting out any dead air or slips you made.

Follow Up with Your Audience

Another reason to love webinars for marketing presentations is because of how easy it is to follow up with your audience. In order to secure access to your program, you should have required that a viewer supply you with their email address.

After your webinar, you can then follow up with them for any number of reasons. It might be to reiterate your CTA after a day or two. You might want to see if anyone has any questions. You could decide to offer them a special deal.

Down the line, if you host another webinar, you can email your former audience members and let them know about your new one coming up. Remember: half the battle involved with effective marketing presentations is making sure people show up, so this can be a huge help.

 

Make Sure You’re Using the Best Possible Tools

While your budget will definitely be a factor here, it’s important that you use the best possible hardware and software for your webinars. You’ll have no shot at creating effective marketing presentations if the people on the other side of the screen can’t hear you or make out your visuals.

The good news is that these important tools are extremely affordable these days. Even the webcams required for webinars can be purchased for less than $100 to $150 (you can spend a lot more, too).

 

Effective Marketing Presentations

Effective marketing presentations are important for the ongoing success of your company, as either a sales tactic or simply a means to increase your company’s mindshare.

Whatever reason you have in mind, if you’re going to be doing these presentations through a webinar, make sure you use the above advice to do so. BigMarker would also be happy to help. Check out our website or send us a message to get in touch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.businessknowhow.com/marketing/sales-presentation.htm

https://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/inspiring-slideshare-presentations-for-marketers-list

https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/234832

https://www.customshow.com/marketing-strategy-presentation-ideas-that-work/

http://blog.gotomeeting.co.uk/2017/03/08/a-guide-to-building-effective-marketing-presentations.html

https://www.searchenginejournal.com/winning-webinars-13-tips-producing-effective-webinar/141732/

http://www.wordstream.com/blog/ws/2014/08/26/how-to-do-a-webinar